Francis Hinton (1889)
Gallery
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Life saving crew rowing to Francis Hinton
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Francis Hinton underway
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Life saving crew rowing to Francis Hinton
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Wreck site map
By The Numbers
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Built
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Sank
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Lives Lost
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Depth (ft)
 
 
Final Voyage


November 16, 1909. The steambarge Francis Hinton, lumber laden and bound from Manistique to Chicago, encountered a gale and attempted to reach the harbor at Manitowoc. The water extinguished the fires, thus crippling the craft. As soon as the vessel reached Manitowoc Bay the crew dropped anchor, but the high seas rolled the stacks and the crew decided to abandon ship. The crew abandoned ship but first let go of the anchor fearing the vessel would founder. The craft subsequently beached 4 1/2 miles south of the life saving station at Two Rivers where it went to pieces.
Today


The vessel Francis Hinton lies broken up in 15' water. The bilge is extant; artifacts and machinery have been salvaged from the site. The Hinton was originally stripped after stranding. The bottom consists of hard clay with some loose silt deposits. Visibility is poor, averaging less than 10'. In addition to the bilges, remains of the engine works and a four-bladed propeller are visible. Due to its shallow depth and exposed location, the wreck has received a significant amount of damage from ice and wave action.
Service History


The Francis Hinton, an archtypical steambarge built by the Danish immigrants Hanson and Scove, was less than the average size for the 1909 lumber fleet. She had a listed capacity of 550,000 board feet.
 
Map
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© 2017 - Wisconsin Sea Grant, Wisconsin Historical Society